Sense of Community Survey – Some initial findings

We are pleased to present some initial findings from the Sense of Community Survey.  The following images show a table of correlations for the primary questions posed by the study, graphs related to these correlations  (top of Y-axes and right of X-axes represent higher values), and maps that provide a spatial view of the sense of community scores.  We will suggest interpretations of this data in a later post.  If you would like to share your own interpretations now, though, please do so in the comments.

Results of Sense of Community Survey
Relationship of sense of community score and population density (people per square kilometer)
Relationship of sense of community score and population density at the very low density quintile
Relationship of sense of community score and population density at the low density quintile
Relationship of sense of community score and population density at the medium density quintile
Relationship of sense of community score and population density at the high density quintile
Relationship of sense of community score and population density at the very high density quintile
Relationship of sense of community score and population density for families with children aged 5-9
Relationship of sense of community score and use of various public spaces
Relationship of sense of community score and interaction in various public spaces
Relationship of sense of community score and feelings of crowding
Relationship of sense of community score and feelings of safety
Relationship of density and feelings of crowding
Relationship of density and feelings of safety
Range of scores for feelings of crowding shown by housing type (1=single-family detached; 2=low-rise attached; 3=low-rise apartment; 4=high-rise apartment)
Range of scores for feelings of safety shown by housing type (1=single-family detached; 2=low-rise attached; 3=low-rise apartment; 4=high-rise apartment)
Downtown and Kitsilano areas showing postal codes representing the sense of community scores for survey respondents (green is higher, red is lower, scores are averaged for postal codes with multiple respondents) and dissemination areas representing density (darker is denser).
Klahanie and surrounding areas showing postal codes representing the sense of community scores for survey respondents (green is higher, red is lower, scores are averaged for postal codes with multiple respondents) and dissemination areas representing density (darker is denser).
University of British Columbia and nearby area showing postal codes representing the sense of community scores for survey respondents (green is higher, red is lower, scores are averaged for postal codes with multiple respondents) and dissemination areas representing density (darker is denser).

November 3, 2019 edit in response to comment asking for SOC score for Hampton Place:

Here are the SOC scores for postal codes within Hampton Place (UBC):  Note that V6T 2H1 is a composite score of 9 responses (and scores 3/4 of a standard deviation better than the survey average), whereas the others represent single responses.  Lower scores represent higher SOC scores (due to the way the questions were structured).

For comparison, here is a graphic showing all SOC scores for postal codes of respondents (and compare to the map above), sorted in descending order of density (some responses were outside of the target study range and do not have density values listed).

2 Replies to “Sense of Community Survey – Some initial findings”

    1. Hi Linda,
      I found the following scores for sense of community for Hampton Place (1 is highest and 5 is lowest, mean = 2.30)
      V6T 2H1 = 1.77 (composite of 9 responses)
      V6T 2H3 = 2.69 (1 response)
      V6T 2G8 = 2.38 (1 response)
      I’ve added a couple of graphics to the end of the main post (can’t add them here) in response to your question, so please see those as well.
      Eric

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